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Nursing Homes in the US

  • 16,100
    Nursing Homes
  • 1,554,376
    Total Medicaid Beds
  • 7.88%
    Patients with pressure ulcers
  • 3.00/5
    Average CMS Rating

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How To Choose the Right Nursing Home?

Choosing the right nursing home for your loved one is a daunting task. At Elder Guide, we try to streamline this process by giving you the tools necessary to begin your search. The best place to start when sizing up any nursing home is its overall grade. Ideally you want to target nursing homes that received an overall grade of B- or higher. The highest quality nursing homes typically receive overall grades of A- or higher. On the other end of the spectrum, we generally recommend avoiding facilities that received D’s or F’s no matter what.

Search 16,100 Nursing Homes Nationwide

We also rate each nursing home in four specific categories: inspections, long-term care, short- term care and nursing. For most people, the most important category is inspections. A nursing home’s grade in this category reflects the data we pulled from government inspections conducted at the facility. Poor grades in this category generally indicate that the nursing home was flagged for major deficiencies. More specifically, you want to avoid facilities that have been flagged for abuse or neglect or labeled as special focus facilities by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”). You also want to be careful with facilities that received category G through L deficiencies as these deficiencies are associated with conditions that threatened the health or safety of residents. Category L deficiencies actually jeopardized residents’ lives or in some cases resulted in a death.

Depending on the level of care you are looking for, you also want to focus on our short-term and long-term care ratings. For prospective residents that recently suffered an injury or had a major surgery and are looking for rehabilitation, our short-term care grades are critical. Rehabilitation services rely on the performance of highly skilled nurses and therapists. Conversely, many of these skilled professionals are not critical for residents in a long-term care setting.

Long-term care residents are more likely to be in a nursing home for a chronic condition, often simply brought on by old age. These individuals tend to be more dependent on nurse’s aides for activities of daily living. As a result, they benefit more from sheer quantity of nursing care. If sufficient care is not provided on a 24/7 basis, these folks could be at risk for a variety of issues including pressure ulcers, falls, urinary tract infections and general neglect. Nursing performance is also measured more directly by our nursing category which is an important category for all prospective residents.

Finally, once you have zeroed in on the services your loved one requires, we highly recommend that you try out our nursing home staffing tool, which is available at the top of each nursing home’s page. This allows you to determine the levels of both medical and therapy staffing provided by the nursing home per resident over the past three years. This is a great way to determine whether a nursing home is truly the right fit based on your loved one’s specific needs. We truly hope you find a nursing home that cares for your loved one as thoroughly as you would care for them yourself.

States by Nursing Home Population Density

State . Ascending orderPopulation per Nursing Home . No order set# of Nursing Homes . No order setAverage Nursing Home Rating . No order set
Alabama27,004177
Grade: B-plus
Alaska37,38019
Grade: A-minus
Arizona46,657137
Grade: B-plus
Arkansas13,625214
Grade: B-minus
California32,2261,156
Grade: B
Colorado24,063209
Grade: B
Connecticut127,64628
Grade: B-plus
Delaware19,95445
Grade: B-plus
Florida27,730678
Grade: B-plus
Georgia27,136357
Grade: B-minus
Hawaii33,17841
Grade: A-minus
Idaho19,84279
Grade: B-plus
Illinois18,676687
Grade: C
Indiana12,589515
Grade: B-minus
Iowa7,270419
Grade: B-plus
Kansas9,057315
Grade: B-plus
Kentucky15,609278
Grade: B
Louisiana16,978267
Grade: B-minus
Maine15,09588
Grade: A-minus
Maryland25,890223
Grade: B
Massachusetts18,496354
Grade: B-plus
Michigan23,476421
Grade: B-minus
Minnesota14,982354
Grade: A-minus
Mississippi14,762201
Grade: B
Missouri11,812507
Grade: B-minus
Montana14,55068
Grade: B
Nebraska9,714188
Grade: B-plus
Nevada41,54665
Grade: B
New Hampshire18,03373
Grade: A-minus
New Jersey25,483345
Grade: B-plus
New Mexico30,28268
Grade: B-minus
New York31,871608
Grade: B-minus
North Carolina23,314409
Grade: B-minus
North Dakota8,84976
Grade: A-minus
Ohio12,246942
Grade: B-minus
Oklahoma13,025288
Grade: B-minus
Oregon29,930128
Grade: B
Pennsylvania18,818675
Grade: B
Rhode Island13,84976
Grade: B
South Carolina24,867186
Grade: B
South Dakota8,30798
Grade: B-plus
Tennessee20,604308
Grade: B
Texas21,7331,157
Grade: C
Utah28,49397
Grade: B-plus
Vermont18,40434
Grade: B-plus
Virginia29,094275
Grade: B-minus
Washington33,791199
Grade: B-minus
West Virginia15,064123
Grade: B
Wisconsin17,129332
Grade: B-plus
Wyoming15,65636
Grade: B-plus